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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/01/2020 in Posts

  1. 1 point
    You dot need a reference to the covergroup class. You can omit this line of code: cg_fsm_state cg_fsm_state_inst; In the constructor you are calling new directly on the coverage class name: cg_fsm_state = new();
  2. 1 point
    Hello @mo_ayman, Well you could get it early for review comments from the people in SystemC LWG. Plus people with similar setup to yours can also take a jab at it in getting it fixed. Regards, Ameya Vikram Singh
  3. 1 point
    Eyck

    no match for ‘operator|’

    Just as explanation: pos() returns an event_finder (a proxy object which allows to use an event which is not yet available) while posedge_event() returns the event itself. And the operator|() is ony defined for sc_event.
  4. 1 point
    You are writing to ports in the constructor of server. At this point they are not bound. Since you initialize them in the beginning of your thread this is not needed anyways. Aside of that you also do not need the sensitivity list for the monitor thread as you never use the default sensitivity (by using wait() ). And if you use C++11 or newer you should use In-class member initializers which eases the naming of signals (and you should name them to make debugging easier): sc_in<bool> begin1{"begin1"}, begin2{"begin2"}, begin3{"begin3"}; sc_in<bool> end1{"end1"}, end2{"end2"}, end3{"end3"}; sc_in<bool> incoming1{"incoming1"}, incoming2{"incoming2"}, incoming3{"incoming3"}; sc_out<bool> free{"free"}, outgoing1{"outgoing1"}, outgoing2{"outgoing2"}, outgoing3{"outgoing3"};
  5. 1 point
    Accellera released the SystemC AMS user's guide application examples, which are available for download via this link. These examples can be executed using your preferred EDA tools, as long as they support the SystemC and SystemC AMS language standard. Alternatively, you can use the open source SystemC and SystemC AMS reference implementations. Instructions for installation and execution can be found in the INSTALL or README files as part of these packages. We welcome your feedback!
  6. 1 point
    Since it seems this is not a interesting topic just in case someone is looking for information I came across these papers http://www.verilab.com/files/litterick_register_final.pdf basically claims that factory registration of registers should be avoided to get better performance results Common issues and pitfalls
  7. 1 point
    Hi Ameya, you're right: The SystemC 2.3.2 release selects a particular C++ standard to build upon and enforces consistency of this selection between the model and the library at link-time. Users can override the detection by setting the SC_CPLUSPLUS macro at build time to a (usually earlier) C++ version, as documented in the RELEASENOTES and INSTALL files of the SystemC 2.3.2 public review release. RELEASENOTES: 5) Initial support for C++11/14 =============================== This package includes an initial implementation of the C++11/14 proposal, presented at DVCon Europe 2016 ("Moving SystemC to a new C++ Standard"). This includes the addition of two new preprocessor symbols: - IEEE_1666_CPLUSPLUS (read-only) This symbol indicates the availability of certain SystemC features which depend on a particular version of the ISO C++ standard (see below). - SC_CPLUSPLUS (overridable) By default, the most recent supported version of the C++ standard for the current platform/compiler is automatically detected and reflected by the SC_CPLUSPLUS macro. Users can override (i.e. usually downgrade) the assumed C++ standard to an earlier version for compatiblity. The value of this macro has to be set consistently across the SystemC library build and all linked models (see INSTALL). The values of these macros follow the values defined by the C++ standards. Currently supported versions are: - 199711L (C++03, ISO/IEC 14882:1998, 14882:2003) - 201103L (C++11, ISO/IEC 14882:2011) - 201402L (C++14, ISO/IEC 14882:2014) The following features currently require a dedicated C++ standard version beyond ISO/IEC 14882:2003 (aka C++03): - C++11 (IEEE_1666_CPLUSPLUS==201103L) o explicit sc_bitref_r<>::operator bool() const Restricts direct boolean conversion of bitvector element references to explicit boolean contexts (e.g. `if` expressions). Use the `to_bool()` function on earlier setups. In the future, further language features depending on modern C++ language constructs may be added. INSTALL: * SC_CPLUSPLUS - Override automatically detected C++ standard support This setting allows downgrading the assumed version of the underlying C++ standard on the current platform. By default, the latest supported version is chosen. Supported values are * SC_CPLUSPLUS=199701L (C++03, ISO/IEC 14882:1998, 14882:2003) * SC_CPLUSPLUS=201103L (C++11, ISO/IEC 14882:2011) * SC_CPLUSPLUS=201402L (C++14, ISO/IEC 14882:2014) Note: This symbol needs to be consistently defined in the library and any application linking against the built library. Especially the last note in the RELEASENOTES is relevant to your question: In order to reduce the complexity of all the different C++ language support differences across compiler versions, the LWG decided to at least enforce a consistent selection of the C++ baseline in the proof-of-concept implementation. Of course, other vendors may chose to allow more flexibility here, although sometimes even a consistent compiler version selection is mandated. With this decision, the implementation does not have to worry about binary compatibility across different (C++ standard dependent) feature sets in the future. As of today, the (currently internal) classes sc_type_index, sc_string_view differ depending on the platform's C++ standard support. Future extensions might change other classes as well. Not worrying about the ABI compatibility is a helpful simplification here. As described above, you can set -DSC_CPLUSPLUS=... consistently on the compiler command-line to build a single library build across several GCC versions. If supported by your platform/compiler, you can still use the different -std=c++XY flags (or their defaults) from the compilers, provided that they generate compatible code across the selected C++ standard version. Hope that clarifies the rationale behind the current implementation. Greetings from Duisburg, Philipp
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