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thomas.haber

SystemC/TLM Debian packages

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Unfortunately SystemC is not in the  Debian repository, so no deb package, so no easy way to install on most Linux systems. :wacko:

Reason for this seem to be licensing problems ("choice of venue" clause).

Does anybody know who's responsible at Accelera for these kind kind of problems ?

Would like to trigger and ask if there is progress.

 

 

#

thomas 

http://toem.de

 

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Hello,

Are you looking for a pre-compiled binary ? We have installed SystemC (both 2.2 and 2.3)

on both Fedora and Ubuntu just by downloading the source code, configuring, compiling

and installing it. Works fine.

 

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Thomas,

 

this topic has been discussed several times in the past, both outside and inside of OSCI/ASI.  Unfortunately, there's not much we can do.

 

OSCI and ASI don't require a copyright transfer for contributions.  Instead, contributions are usually made under the terms of the "SystemC Open Source License Agreement". And since the bits and pieces within the SystemC code base came from a wide variety of sources in the past ~15 years, it would take a huge effort to relicense the proof-of-concept implementation in the future.  Or it may not be possible at all.

 

Given that, I don't expect much further "progress" on this issue, especially as it doesn't solve a "real" problem.

 

If you want to help users to easily install SystemC/TLM on Linux distributions, aligned with the distributions' package management, feel free to contribute the required RPM/DEB infrastructure under an appropriate open-source license to allow its inclusion in the proof-of-concept implementation.  Together with some documentation, this could already solve most of the perceived incovenience.

 

Greetings from Oldenburg,

  Philipp

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Hello,

Are you looking for a pre-compiled binary ? We have installed SystemC (both 2.2 and 2.3)

on both Fedora and Ubuntu just by downloading the source code, configuring, compiling

and installing it. Works fine.

Thanks for the reply Dakupoto,

i know that its working, but its not comfortable.

Using Ubuntu you can easily install lots of  Verilog and VHDL tools.

Its strange that its not possible with SystemC .

 

best regards,

thomas

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Thomas,

 

this topic has been discussed several times in the past, both outside and inside of OSCI/ASI.  Unfortunately, there's not much we can do.

 

OSCI and ASI don't require a copyright transfer for contributions.  Instead, contributions are usually made under the terms of the "SystemC Open Source License Agreement". And since the bits and pieces within the SystemC code base came from a wide variety of sources in the past ~15 years, it would take a huge effort to relicense the proof-of-concept implementation in the future.  Or it may not be possible at all.

 

Given that, I don't expect much further "progress" on this issue, especially as it doesn't solve a "real" problem.

 

If you want to help users to easily install SystemC/TLM on Linux distributions, aligned with the distributions' package management, feel free to contribute the required RPM/DEB infrastructure under an appropriate open-source license to allow its inclusion in the proof-of-concept implementation.  Together with some documentation, this could already solve most of the perceived incovenience.

 

Greetings from Oldenburg,

  Philipp

 

Hallo Phillipp,

 

I must admit that i don't understand the licensing problem fully.

But the "choice of venue" clause is nothing that has to do with copyright.

And I don't think that  this lack of convinience ( SCV) is not a "real" problem.

 

The release management can only get better.

 

thanks and best regards ,

thomas

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Thomas,

 

I must admit that i don't understand the licensing problem fully.

But the "choice of venue" clause is nothing that has to do with copyright.

 

Implicitly, it has.  Accellera Systems Initiative can not relicense the code (e.g. removing the choice of venue clause), because it does not own the full copyright. Obtaining permission from all past contributors is (close to) impossible.

 

And I don't think that  this lack of convinience ( SCV) is not a "real" problem.

 

SCV? Anyways, as I said: Feel free to contribute packaging infrastructure.  The means of distribution can still be discussed separately. A lot of things are not available in the "official" Debian/Ubuntu package repositories (Adobe products, Skype, Mendeley, Opera, Steam, …) and still by providing prebuilt packages they are quite easily installable.

 

/Philipp

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The fact that there is not a package makes my life harder.

Imagine the situation when you developed library which is dependent on SystemC.

This library should be installable by command to package manager as any other package.

But it is not possible to do so because SystemC library which does not have package and it is not possible to create one.

It is simple installation but it destroyed the packaging system and that is the problem.


I know that word of hardware development will be always more conservative.

But It is very easy to create automatic deploy script which will create and deploy the package for you on every release.

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8 hours ago, nic30 said:

I know that word of hardware development will be always more conservative.

Unfortunately being a hardware developer you are doomed to suffer. You should either accept it, or quit :)

EDA vendors assume that you will be using SystemC as a part of some commercial simulation or synthesis tool, and Red Hat 6 is the only supported platform in general. 

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Since the relicensing of the SystemC reference installation under the Apache 2.0 license, there should be no more legal obstacles for package the SystemC libraries for your favorite Linux distribution. Someone just needs to make the effort. Both, the new experimental CMake-based build system introduced with the SystemC 2.3.2 public preview release as well as the autotools based build system provide the necessary functionality to configure/compile/install SystemC in an unattended way, which is needed to automatically build the usual package formats DEB and RPM. CMake comes even with CPack, which should further simplify the process. However, the current CMakeLists.txt files in the SystemC 2.3.2 public preview release do not yet contain the necessary settings for CPack due to the limited bandwidth/time of the authors. Feedback and suggestions on how to improve the installation of the SystemC libraries as well as actively contributing to their development by becoming a member of the respective Accellera working groups are welcome!

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