Jump to content

Recommended Posts

See the glossary of the SystemC standard paragraph B.183 p580.

 

regards

Alan

 

P.S. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, it is always best to look things up in the standard first.

 

P.P.S. If you're young and don't know what a broken record is, imagine I said "scratched CD"

 

P.P.P.S If you're really young and don't know what a scratched CD is, imagine I said "sample with corrupted loop points" :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whenever you call a generic protocoll function lile b_transport or nb_transport you supply an sc_time argument as reference so it can changed be the callee. This delay argument is the offset of the begin (when calling the function) or to the end (after the function returns) of this transaction to the current simulation time point. This is called timing annotation...

Best regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks  @Eyck

I want to understand clearly in figure 26 above, 

The initiator sends to target with timing annotation is 10ns, when targets received the request, it is delay 10ns (timing annotation) then the target begin handing request

understand is right or wrong????

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hook,

Yes, this is correct.  The initiator calls nb_transport_fw in the target with a delay of 10ns timing annotation.  In order to respect the timing annotation, the target placed the transaction into a payload_event_queue (PEQ) and it will emerge from the PEQ after 10ns (this is done by calling peq_with_get.notify(trans, delay) where the delay argument is what was passed into nb_transport_fw).

Similarly at time = 125ns, the target calls nb_transport_bw to the initiator with a delay of 10ns.  The initiator does the same thing--puts the transaction into its own PEQ with a delay of 10ns.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×