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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/10/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    maehne

    Making a port optional

    If you don't use the member functions added that were added for convenience to `sc_in`, `sc_out`, and `sc_inout` to, e.g., call `read()`, `write()`, and the event member functions via the `.` operator than via the corresponding member function in the interface accessed via the `->` operator, you might be able to avoid entirely the derivation of new port classes. Instead, you could simply use a template alias, which was introduced with C++'11: template<typename T> using sc_in_opt = sc_core::sc_port<sc_signal_in_if<T>, 1, SC_ZERO_OR_MORE_BOUND>; template<typename T> using sc_inout_opt = sc_core::sc_port<sc_signal_inout_if<T>, 1, SC_ZERO_OR_MORE_BOUND>; template<typename T> using sc_out_opt = sc_core::sc_port<sc_signal_inout_if<T>, 1, SC_ZERO_OR_MORE_BOUND>; If you want to also provide all member functions of `sc_in`, `sc_out`, and `sc_inout`, you will have to derive from the `sc_port` class and implement the full interface as defined in IEEE Std 1666-2011.
  2. 1 point
    Hi. This is because an unbound port cannot be read. A port forwards all read and write calls to the actual interface (signal) it is bound to. In you module constructor, you are still in the model set up and elaboration phase. The port is not yet bound to any signal. Hence, you cannot read from it. Accessing ports should not be done befor end-of-elaboration. Greetings Ralph
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