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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/20/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    SystemC 2.3.2 (and later) does support a query whether an event was triggered in the previous delta cycle (or immediately in the current evaluation cycle). This is similar to the sc_signal<>::event() function. With this, you can ask every element in your array, whether it was triggered and may have caused a wakeup of the process. Of course, multiple events can have triggered simultaneously and will only cause a single wakeup of the process. for( const auto ev& : e ) { if ( ev.triggered() ) { // ... } } Hope that helps, Philipp
  2. 2 points
    The issue is likely caused because you access a port (via -> or for example calling functions like .read()) already inside the module constructor. You should only access ports after binding has completed, this means from within a SystemC process or in end_of_elaboration() / start_of_simulation() callbacks. Hope that helps, Philipp
  3. 2 points
    This means that a port is not bound to an interface. A port is just a kind of a forwarder of an interface. So if none is bound nothing can be forwarded. E.g. if you have a sc_in<bool> it forwards the sc_signal_in_if which allows you to read and wait for events. But there needs to be 'something on the other side' which is usually a signal (implementing the sc_signal_in_if) being bound to the socker. But without further information it is hard to provide more help. Best regards
  4. 2 points
    Thanks! I can reproduce the behavior and verified that removing the dynamic sensitivity in sc_thread_process::kill_process fixes the issue: void sc_thread_process::kill_process(sc_descendant_inclusion_info descendants ) { // ... if ( sc_is_running() && m_has_stack ) { m_throw_status = THROW_KILL; m_wait_cycle_n = 0; remove_dynamic_events(); // <-- add this line to avoid the exception simcontext()->preempt_with(this); } // ... } I'm not sure, if it is necessary to do the same for the static sensitivity. At least I haven't come up with a similar scenario, where the error is actually "incorrect".
  5. 1 point
    David Black

    sc_uint and unsigned int

    First, let me say that I would never use sc_signal<unsigned int>. Instead use sc_signal<std::uint32_t> for portability reasons. There are two considerations: sc_signal<uint32_t> is likely to be significantly faster than sc_signal<sc_uint<32>>. Especially if using the PoC implementation. sc_signal<sc_uint<32>> may be required by some synthesis tools if that is something you care about. If you want to be agnostic to both situations, you could set up a typedef header for your project and use your own names.
  6. 1 point
    You should start with learning your synthesis tool documentation. C++/SystemC synthesis is very tool-specific.
  7. 1 point
    Your calls to the configure script don't include the option --prefix to specify the destination directory for installation. This is strongly recommended as the SystemC installation layout does not match well with the standard Unix directory layout for a conflict-free installation. Personally, I prefer to install SystemC on Unix-like platforms to /opt/systemc-2.3.3 (or similar). After make install, you can make sure that the include and lib-* directory below the prefix contains the necessary files. When building against this SystemC version, you will have to pass the proper include and linker flags. I recommend that you read the INSTALL and RELEASENOTES files, which are part of the SystemC PoC implementation. You may also consider to use the experimental CMake-based build system instead of the autotools.
  8. 1 point
    swami-cst

    TLM_INCOMPLETE_RESPONSE

    You seem to be probing the transaction response, before driving your transaction :) Since the default transaction status is TLM_INCOMPLETE_RESPONSE, you are getting that message. Try moving the call to b_transport before checking the trans.is_response_error() ...
  9. 1 point
    The release contains a file docs/scv/scvref/vwg_1_0e.pdf which (sort of) clarifies this.
  10. 1 point
    Hi Maxim, After reading some SCV documentation, it looks like we're not allowed to use smart pointers in your preferred way. E.g. we need to use "addr()" (without specific member functions like "range(int, int)") as a basis for building the expression we are using in a later stage. In your case, a practical solution would be to have no constraint on the generated address but to mask the 2 LSB after generation. -- greetz, Bas
  11. 1 point
    Eyck

    Checking ports for power estimations

    I'm not sure if I get your first question right. Essentially this is a C++ question. But what you could do is a type erase of your (POD) data, use it as a byte array and count the changed bits using XOR (be carefull to you plain data, no classes). Something like: struct my_data { int x; long y; }; my_data old_val, new_val; uint8_t* old_data = reinterpret_cast<uint8_t*>(&old_val); uint8_t* new_data = reinterpret_cast<uint8_t*>(&new_val); unsigned toggles=0; for(size_t i=0; i<sizeof(my_data); ++i){ uint8_t diff = *(old_data+i)^*(new_data+i); uint8_t mask=1; for(size_t j=0; j<8; ++j, mask<<=1) if(mask&diff) ++toggles; } Regarding your second question: you transport the data via a signal which implements the signal_in_if. This interface has a value_changed_event() getter which returns an event firing when the value of the signal changes. Just wait for this event.
  12. 1 point
    What you can do is build your driver software as a shared library with a main function. In a SC_THREAD you just load the library and execute the main function. Along with this you have to implement a few utility functions (read, write, wait) which interact with the SystemC kernel or your DUT and being used by the main function (and the called functions from there). This is called host based or host compiled simulation (you may check the search engine of your choice for it). With some infrastructure it is even possible to mimic interrupt. Another option is to use some instruction set simulator (e.g. QEMU, DBT-RISE-RISCV, or some commercial alternatives) and do you driver development using a virtual prototype... Best regards
  13. 1 point
    tjd

    tlm_fifo nb_peek

    Just generated one. There is a tarball attached that contains a producer, consumer, and a main that connects the two. Also included is a simple bash script with my compilation commands and the log generated from running the script where I've also appended the G++ version to it. tlm_ex.tar
  14. 1 point
    Minimal example of the actual underlying issues posted here: http://forums.accellera.org/topic/6232-killing-a-process-with-an-included-sc_event_andor_list/
  15. 1 point
    Hi Bhargav, In the 1685-2014 version, component wire ports can be multidimensional, i.e., it can have muliple arrays and multiple vectors. For this reason, a portReference must support multiple dimensions as well. This is done using the partSelect element. The partSelect element can contain a single range with left and right to support a single vector as before. Or it can contain can indices plus a range. The indices indicate which dimension the range applies to. If the indices contain more than one index then the first indices apply to the arrays and the last indices apply to the vectors. Best regards, Erwin
  16. 1 point
    BEGIN_REQ/END_REQ and BEGIN_RESP/END_RESP mark time points in the protocol. So in the stanndard implementation you have 2 phases: request and response. Depending on the type of access various data is been transferred: for a read REQ usually carries the addr while RESP carries the data and status while during a write REQ carries addess and data while RESP just carries the status. It is up to the initiator and target to care for consistency of the data in the payload, in most implementations I''ve seen the data is sampled/set at the BEGIN_* time point. Best regards
  17. 1 point
    To answer the question of a fifo multiple writers and one reader, I would suggest either of two approaches: Create a module with a vector of inputs (1 per writer) and the sc_fifo output. A simple method process can then arbitrate and facilitate placing incoming data onto the output. This has the advantage of allowing a custom arbitration scheme Create an internal std::queue and limit access with a mutex (sc_mutex might work). Since the queue doesn't have a limitation, it will be up to you to manage maximum depth issues. Downside is that arbitration is managed by the mutex and may not be ideal. For a fifo with multiple readers, you probably need a manager to decide arbitrate requests, which is similar to 1 above.
  18. 1 point
    In general, your design would not work because reading a real hardware FIFO takes time and readers would get entangled. How would you manage that? Second, you are not using the correct methodology to connect up your FIFO, which is why you don't see the error. SystemC expects you to connect modules to channels using ports. Skipping the hierarchy and connecting consumers using pointers is incorrect. Instead, you consumer should replace your my_fifo pointer with a fifo port. You have two choices: sc_port< sc_fifo_in_if<int> my_fifo_port; or sc_fifo_in<int> my_fifo_port; The syntax to access the fifo will be my_fifo_port->read(). Next you will need to attempt to connect the port to the fifo during construction in your producer with: for( int i=0...4 ) consumer.port.bind( my_fifo ); When you run you will encounter an error during elaboration (construction) that you already have a connection and fifo ports don't allow more than one binding.
  19. 1 point
    David Black

    simple socket

    I would suggest that those for-loops need a better bound and should be coded: sc_assert( objA->initiator_socket.size() >= objB->target_socket.size() && objB->target_socket.size() > 0 ); for( int i=0;i<objA->initiator_socket.size(); ++i ) { objA->initiator_socket[i].bind(objB->target_socket[i]); } Coding rule: NEVER use a literal constant when a reasonable alternative is possible. Even when "in a hurry", you will not be disappointed if you use this rule.
  20. 1 point
    Eyck

    TLM transaction tracing

    Maybe a little bit late but there are socket implementations available which do trace tlm transactions int a SCV database. They can be found at https://github.com/Minres/SystemC-Components/tree/master/incl/scv4tlm and are used e.g. at https://github.com/Minres/SystemC-Components/blob/5f7387ab7e3dfc2ff6a7cac6fbe834ed7ec8ae36/incl/sysc/tlmtarget.h which in turn serve as building blocks in https://github.com/Minres/SystemC-Components-Test/tree/master/examples/simple_system The setup given by Kai is put into sysc::tracer where all the tracing setup (VCD & SCV) is impelemted. Best regards -Eyck
  21. 1 point
    David Black

    sytemc temperal decoupling

    Read IEEE 1666-2011 sections 9 & 10. Available for free download from http://www.accellera.org/downloads/ieee. Or watch a free video from https://www.doulos.com/knowhow/systemc/. Or take a class on SystemC & TLM from https://www.doulos.com/content/training/systemc_training.php. TLM 2.0 is a marketable skill and I get many requests for job references. You will need to become proficient at C++, SystemC fundamentals, and then TLM 2.0 in addition to having a good basic knowledge of hardware and software design.
  22. 1 point
    David Black

    approximately timed

    IEEE 1666-2011 section 10.2 states: IEEE 1666-2011 section 10.3.4 states:
  23. 1 point
    You can use a custom "creator" to initialize elements of a vector with custom constructor parameters - here the inner vector. Something like this (assuming you have lambda support available): auto element_creator = [](const char* nm, size_t) // optional, depending on the "real" value type { return new sca_module(nm); }; size_t inner_size = 42; // adjust for your needs, could also be a vector of sizes element.init( outer_size, [&](const char* nm, size_t) { return new sc_vector<sca_module>( nm, inner_size, element_creator ); } ); If you don't have lambdas in your environment, you need to put the functionality in a custom function, e.g. static sc_vector<sca_module>* element_vector_creator(size_t size, const char* name, size_t) { return new sc_vector<sca_module(name, size); } // using sc_bind to pass in the size - placeholders needed for actual call element.init( outer_size, sc_bind(element_vector_creator, inner_size, sc_unnamed::_1, sc_unnamed::_2) ); Hope that helps, Philipp
  24. 1 point
    Hi. This is because an unbound port cannot be read. A port forwards all read and write calls to the actual interface (signal) it is bound to. In you module constructor, you are still in the model set up and elaboration phase. The port is not yet bound to any signal. Hence, you cannot read from it. Accessing ports should not be done befor end-of-elaboration. Greetings Ralph
  25. 1 point
    apfitch

    loosely timed vs accurate timed ??

    In a loosely timed model you only have two timing points - start of transaction, end of transaction. In an approximately timed model using the base protocol, you have four timing points - start request, end request, start response, end response - hence you can model overlapped (pipelined) transactions, because you can start a new request before you have the response to the previous request. In my example above, you would only be able to send a new transaction every 75 ns using loosely timed, so the model of the timing of the transaction is less accurate - in the loosely timed model I can send a new transaction every 75 ns, in approximately timed every 50 ns using that example. If you do not use overlapped transactions, then you could just use begin request and end response, so as you say the non-blocking (approximately timed) and blocking (loosely timed) models would give the same results, regards Alan
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